Thursday, October 1, 2015

Nothing to Say

It's October. Oh holy hell. Not again.

Everyone is asking me to either say something or  participate in something pink. Why? When have I ever been pink?

I was first diagnosed in September - so I had to go through the first horrifying month of chemo in a sea of pink ribbons and happy faces. In the real world, I slept on the bathroom floor because I was so sick from treatment I had to.

Breast Cancer is a cancer just as real as any other. But for some reason, this particular cancer is downgraded and infantilized. The focus is on  "Saving the Boobies!" not saving the lives of the 250,000 women who are diagnosed each year with over  40,000 dying of the disease annually. No. It is easier to make it pretty in pink. Easier for whom?


In the past week I was asked if my foundation, "Gets a lot of donations because it is October?"  Uh, no. People are too tapped out from buying pink toilet paper and pink fuel filters and pink shoelaces and pink ... everything. As I was checking out at a local store today the cashier asked if I would like to "Give to breast cancer?" Give what? What more can I possibly give? I asked her which breast cancer? She said, "You know, the one that you give to." I bit my tongue and said, no.


Nevertheless, it is upon us. In its full pink glory. Everyone looks so happy. The idiotic glee celebrating rapidly duplicating cells that are attempting to claim your life. This misguided and dangerous joy is hurting the women who are afflicted with this cancer. It is devastating to the women who are dying from this cancer. How do you explain the giddy excitement of Pinktober to a child who lost their mom? I know a lot of kids who lost moms. Trust me. They aren't having as much fun as the pink zombies want you to believe they are.  But no matter, as long as one percent of your purchase price goes to "a breast cancer charity" you should feel really great about doing your bit for breast cancer.


I run a non-profit foundation for women trying to get through breast cancer and we have never exploited the month of October for fundraising purposes. Why? Because women have breast cancer twelve months a year. And we help women during every single one of them. Our care doesn't stop after Halloween.


I do not use profanity in my writing, I keep things clean and professional. But, sometimes, only someone who really gets it, can put things into perspective. I wish everyone took breast cancer as seriously as other cancers. Other cancers like the one that took Warren Zevon. He wrote this in response to his diagnosis and treatment. It's not pink. Neither is breast cancer. Cancer is cancer. And the next time someone asks you to wear a pink boa and act like a child, please remember that THIS is what having cancer feels like...





1 comment:

Nurit Israeli said...

Deeply touched by your words, dear Gina.